Installing Electrical Accessories on Your Motorcycle

Adding electrical accessories to your bike is an age-old custom for street and touring riders. Heated grips, fog lights, USB charging ports, GPS systems, sound systems, gear-position indicators and auxiliary brake lights all add to our comfort, enjoyment and safety out on the road. All of these devices need power, however, and it’s important that any electrical connections you make are done properly and that your bike’s charging system is up to the task. Before you ask anything more of your motorcycle’s electrical system (it’s already supporting a headlight and taillight, fuel pump, gauges, an ignition system, and the occasional turn signal, brake light and horn) you’ll want to verify the health of your battery. A good place to start is by checking the resting voltage with a multimeter. Despite being a “12-volt” battery, it should actually show closer to 12.6 volts when fully charged, with 12.0 volts correlating to an unhealthy 50-percent state of charge. Modern absorbed glass mat (AGM) and gel batteries have a lifespan of about four to seven years, so you would be wise to swap it for a fresh one if it’s getting on in years. If there’s any corrosion on the terminals, remove the ...

Local accessory brand Frankitas promotes Uzbek ikat, the most environmentally friendly fabric in the world

Although its history is truly compelling, it is the modern applications of Uzbek ikat that appealed to Turner (Photo: Haris Hassan/The Edge) In the local accessories landscape, Frankitas has always stood out for its unmistakable aesthetic — bags and clutches in practical shapes, utilising traditionally woven fabrics in bold colours. The brand’s Webe and Travel bags are made with Rang Rang fabric from Indonesia, while the bulk of its handheld clutches and evening bags feature boldly coloured ikat silk fabric from Uzbekistan. “It is, by far, the best ikat there is,” Frankitas’ founder Francisca Turner says about Uzbek ikat. “Weavers still use ancient, traditional techniques and bold, beautiful motifs. There is no heavy machinery used, and all-natural dyes with no chemicals — this makes it the most environmentally friendly fabric in the world because the waste is biodegradable. Making ikat fabric in Uzbekistan is a 9 to 12 step process, which weavers there still adhere to. If you’re talking about handwoven fabric, it’s really very intricate.” A weaving style common to many world cultures, ikat is probably one of the oldest forms of textile decoration. As textiles do not last well t...